Open-source Swag(ger)

Since starting at Apigee almost 10 weeks ago, it has been a whirlwind of an experience, during which I was welcomed into the open-source world. My summer project was dedicated to the Swagger Descriptive API Framework, a robust, open-source project with a wonderful community of developers. From the first day, our coaches impressed upon us the importance of contributing to open-source projects, something that I believe Apigee as a company finds extremely valuable. Through my internship here, my persepctive on programming has grown. I once saw programming as an exclusive activity that is highly competitive and pits developer against developer to produce the best code. Now I realize that programming is about the community as much as it is about solving the world’s problems.

About 7 weeks into our internship, my partner and I released a tool to the Swagger community that generates a bunch of code used to test your Swagger-defined API. Not only did we get to release our project into the wild, but we also got to present our work to the developers that would be using it at a Swagger Developer meet-up in San Francisco. Just before we released the project, our coaches informed us that we would be going to this meetup and that we would replace them in their presentation slot so that we could show off our work.

Linjie and I presenting at the Swagger Meetup in SF
Linjie and I presenting at the Swagger Meetup in SF

Needless to say, I felt extremely empowered by this vote of confidence from our coaches. They have always trusted us with responsibilities beyond those of a normal intern, given us the opportunity to shine and have made a huge, positive impact on my personal image as a developer.

The meet-up is where it all came together for me. As we talked with our peers in the community, I realized that this tool was part of something bigger than just my summer internship. Attendees were excited with our offering and did not hesitate to give feedback on our development choices or just to say that they liked it,  As I write this, our module on NPM has over 1100 downloads in about 2 weeks, 106 of which happened in the last day. This is empirical proof that the open-source projects Apigee facilitates are important to the community they belong to and confirmation of my newfound view on programming as a collective institution.

Go checkout our project and other cool Swagger tools by Apigee here!

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Is Working So Bad?

Wide-eyed and mystified, I walked into the most orange office I had ever seen.

Orange is a bold color, but an even bolder statement that reflects Apigee’s drive and innovation. Up until a few months ago, I had never heard of Apigee, but now I see Apigee everywhere.

Full of optimism, I walked into my first day ready to take on whatever challenge lay before me. I was partially ready. Despite my lack of experience, Apigee provided me with opportunities to learn and do meaningful work under guidance of many intelligent individuals.

Shoutout to Dibyo, Kris, Jane, Thomas, Alex, Thameem, Marc, Jyoti, and Arghya.

We, the Guardians of the Apigee, have sworn to defend Apigee’s reputation by ensuring that Apigee delivers quality products.

My partner Jordan and I worked to uphold that oath by working to create a system to filter through similar metric data. Our goal was to deliver a product that provided key insights into potential customer incidents. We worked with various technologies that were completely new to me. Through these 10 weeks, we had the privilege of struggling and finally conquering the project.

Like Apigee ambitions, this is the path that I have chosen. Working with smart people on hard problems. Is work so bad?

 

Unforgettable Experience in Swagger Meetup

On July 28, Our lovely mentor Mohsen took Noah and me to San Francisco to attend a Meetup: Iterative API Development with Swagger. We presented the project we are working on: the automated end to end test generation to swagger-node. We also met Tony Tam, the father of Swagger! He talked about the swagger spec integration with Java. It was really really a great experience, we had a lot of fun. I appreciated this opportunity very much :)))

Demo moment